"last minute" revision XXX

Find existing knowledge and gaps and remediate as you go along

Here's how.

  1. Choose from one of these topic areas (and follow the link in blue)

    number (short and simple)word problem and proportionalgebrageometry and measurestatistics and probability
    calculator skillsmoney problemsalgebra graphsarea, perimeter and volumecomplete data diagrams
    number skillsproportionalgebra manipulatelength and angleinterpret data diagrams

    which sign ?algebra representgeometry and measure (other)probability and statistics

    wordy FDPR (fraction, decimal, %, ratio)


  2. Identify existing knowledge and gaps and teach or review forgotten learning in those gaps. The teacher can do this in one of two ways (see below)
    1. traditional learning (with a timely practice twist)
    2. timely practice learning 
  3. Students practice what they have learned.
  4. Return to step 1

Traditional learning: revise a mix of problems 

In the traditional revision lesson the teacher tells the student the topic(s) they are working on and gets the students (within the lesson) to self assess to find the correct level of work (differentiation). The teacher will provide a number of different resources (all of which are available - follow the links in the table above). The lesson plan would be something like this.

  • teachers sets the "mixed bag" of questions to all the students telling the students "this work is to help find out what you need more practice on". 

Most of the "mixed bag" sets of questions can be used by several students (perhaps print on card?) - and their answers should be written in their maths books (only a few are worksheets), but the self assessment grids are worksheets (with between 2 and 6 copies on one page). 

  • students do all the questions that they can do 
    • if the teacher, other adult or indeed another student helps a student with some work this should be recorded with the word `clue' written beside the work
  • students mark the questions themselves using the student self assessment answer grid. The student categorises the question and (fills in a code) 
    • really easy, I know how to do this, accurately and confidently (suggested assessment code: double tick) 
    • I got a clue from someone else, but after that I got it right (suggested assessment code: clue and tick)
    • I made a mistake, but when I marked the question I was able to find my mistake (suggested assessment code: oops and tick)
    • I thought I knew how to do this, and I'm not sure why I got it wrong (suggested assessment code: oops and question mark)
    • I remember doing this type of question, but I don't remember enough to "have a go" at this question (suggested assessment code: double exclamation mark)
    • too hard, I don't recognise this type of question, I don't think I've ever learned this work (suggested assessment mark: double question mark)

  • After the student has done the self assessment the teacher (in the first revision lesson using the timely practice assessment sheets) the teacher can do any of the following
    • ask students to find practice worksheets - prioritising (clue and tick) and (oops and tick) types of work
    • teacher scans the students self assessment answer grid and sets the student a follow up activity (which could be more self assessment).
    • the teacher picks up on a popular type of mistake and does some class teaching and sets an activity.
    • the teacher sets more self assessment work to fill the lesson time.
  • It is sensible for the teacher to record the class' assessment* to facilitate planning later revision lessons (revision topics spreadsheet EXCEL.xlsx is grid to paste onto a spreadsheet add in the class names - makes transferring data from pencil and paper to timely practice simple) 

In later revision lessons the teacher will be able to plan a mix of 

    • revising/new teaching (using the worksheets provided, follow the blue link above which will lead to e.g. shapeProperty1.pdf) and 
    • more self assessment. 

The self assessment in itself is useful, as by students searching their memories, or even by getting a clue from another student/teacher the student will improve their memory of the type of work they have puzzled out. 

At the end of every revision lesson everyone thinks "job done" we've revised that or ...

... add in a timely practice twist. The teacher can set some of the work to be reviewed at timely intervals. The teacher would do this (most quickly) by collating the information* from the student self assessments and setting some of the work to some of the students to be reviewed at timely intervals. For each of the student codes below the teacher action is given.

    • really easy, I know how to do this, accurately and confidently (suggested assessment code: double tick) - for "last minute" revision don't set
    • I got a clue from someone else, but after that I got it right (suggested assessment code: clue and tick) - set "new learning"
    • I made a mistake, but when I marked the question I was able to find my mistake (suggested assessment code: oops and tick) - set "new learning"
    • I thought I knew how to do this, and I'm not sure why I got it wrong (suggested assessment code: oops and exclamation mark) - set "new learning"
    • I remember doing this type of question, but I don't remember enough to "have a go" at this question (suggested assessment code: double exclamation mark) - don't set
    • too hard, I don't recognise this type of question, I don't think I've ever learned this work (suggested assessment mark: double question mark) don't set

With the timely practice twist students will then be doing three types of activities in future revision lessons

  • review of previously learned work - which is entirely personalised - through answering exam style questions 
  • more self assessment on different topic areas
  • learning or revising new work 

*Teachers may find the collation of student's self assessment work more time consuming than merely setting and marking timely practice assignments - or teachers may find student copying of others work (without acknowledging with the word 'clue') that they prefer to do the pre-assessment (revision topics spreadsheet EXCEL.xlsx is grid to paste onto a spreadsheet add in the class names - makes transferring data from pencil and paper to timely practice simple) 

timely practice learning: teachers will save "outside of lesson" planning, preparation and marking time with timely practice

Pre-assess the lesson before, a few strands from a few topics, of the work you plan to teach the following lesson.

Do this by setting an NLA assignment (New Learning Assessment). Here instead of every member of the class working on the same "mixed bag" of questions, students work on different questions of the same type, which means the teacher knows which students can do the work independently and accurately, and severely reduces the chance of "copying" other students' work.

Mark the pre-assessment - it's very quick - quicker than collating student's own pre-assessment sheets. Automatically a profile of the student's abilities and gaps is built up. The teacher can use either of these profiles

  • the progress on topic - a profile of the whole class' learning within one topic
  • the student tracker - an individual student's learning over all topics 

to help plan what work the class or student should learn the following lesson. The teacher can easily see the "gaps" in the students skills e.g. a student can do multiplyNC 3 but not multiplyNC 5 then the teacher will know to have multiplyNC 4 and multiplyNC5 worksheets ready for the student. Thus students will only be doing

  • valuable new learning (work they definitely don't know how to do)
  • or timely practice review (which will increase the length of time a student can remember what they have learned)
  • timely practice pre assessment or post assessment in lessons (which will help identify what each student already knows or what they have learned within the lesson)

The timely practice app takes responsibility for deciding when the students should practice each type of question. All the teacher needs to do is to set, say 10, timely practice questions to each student within a TiP (timely practice) assignment (at least 3 times a week).